Nectunt Blog

Social Dilemmas and Human Behavior


1 Comment

Isolating the effect of conditional dissociation on the emergence of cooperation.

(Versión en español aquí)

In previous posts of this blog (here, and here) we have already discussed the effect of reputation and dynamic links on cooperation. Recently, we have performed a series of experiments to explore the effect of information, together with the possibility of changing partners, on the cooperative behavior. In this post, I report on a theoretical study: Leave and let leave: A sufficient condition to explain the evolutionary emergence of cooperation, by Luis Izquierdo, Segismundo Izquierdo and Fernando Vega-Redondo, Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control , 4691–113 (2014). In this study, the authors isolate the effect of conditional dissociation (that is, the possibility of breaking a partnership based on the partner’s behavior) by proposing a model that they solve both analytically, through a mean-field approximation, and numerically. They show that the conditional dissociation mechanism is enough to sustain a significant level of cooperation if the expected lifetime of individuals is sufficiently long.

Continue reading

Estirar_de_la_soga


Leave a comment

Rationality and cooperation (I).

In my first entry on this blog, let me address a topic that constitutes a key point in almost any study on human behavior, namely rationality. The word rational belongs to everyday language, and its meaning depends strongly on the context in which it is used. Even in its technical sense, rationality does not have a single meaning, having different meanings in evolutionary biology, sociology, economics and politics. And even within a particular science, rationality may have different forms: the German sociologist Max Weber distinguished four types of rationality. Just as any other sociological approach, this interpretation has its detractors, among them pragmatists. In this entry, I will try to discuss what could be called rational in a certain number of situations modeled by game theory, and not always coincide with the classical definition of rationality as utility maximization.

(Versión en español aquí)
Continue reading